Talking with Children’s Author S.A. Bodeen

Talking Ed. with S.A. Boodeen

Episode 006 (View entire series)

S.A. Bodeen is the author of the acclaimed [young adult] novels The Compound, The Gardener, The Raft, and The Fallout. She is also the author of the Shipwreck Island series for middle grade readers” and she has books scheduled for publication in the next few months. “Raised on a dairy farm in Wisconsin, she was a Peace Corps volunteer in Tanzania, an experience which inspired her to write Elizabeti’s Doll, her first award-winning picture book” (Source).

I enjoyed visiting with Stephanie (She said that’s what her friends call her.) and especially appreciated this advice she offered to young authors.

S.A. Bodeen's Advice for Young Authors

The following is the video from the interview. In it, she discusses her background, highlights some of her books, provides additional advice to young authors, and discusses ways that she would enjoy connecting with you and your students.

Further Investigation

S.A. Bodeen’s Official Website, Facebook, and Twitter

Complete Bibliography

Author Pages at Amazon and GoodReads

Suggested Reading: Literacy and Mobile Learning

Image representing iPad as depicted in CrunchBase
Image via CrunchBase

Book Apps: A Reading Revolution, or the End of Reading?
“Even if high-quality apps do manage to change the way we read, though, it’s unclear how many current readers will respond. The mere fact that something is possible does not automatically make it desirable.”

Books vs. Screens: Which Should Your Kids Be Reading?
“Canadian author Margaret Atwood thrilled her 285,000-plus Twitter followers by defending their kind as “dedicated readers” who are boldly exploring new frontiers in literacy. Calling the Internet in general “a great literacy driver,” she defended even the most minimal form of screen-based reading as an unalloyed good – “because reading is in fact extremely interactive from a neurological point of view,” she said. “Your brain lights up a lot.””

For Some Kids, a Book Is Just an iPad That Doesn’t Work
“[Calvin] Wang designs interactive storybooks for the iPad. He was inspired, he says, by watching his daughter interact with a movable cardboard book. Since then, Loud Crow, his Vancouver-based firm, has turned an array of children’s picture books that take the pop-up concept into the digital age. Books such as Beatrix Potter’s Peter Rabbit now respond to touch by moving, twirling, speaking and noise-making.”

Digital Lit: How New Ways to Read Mean New Ways to Write
“The e-book is changing the publishing business, but will digital technology actually change the way we tell stories, the way writers write – for better or for worse?”