DIY: Awesome Skills for Awesome Kids

DIY home page
DIY.org

Guest Blogger
Raina Burditt

Why DIY.org?

DIY.org is a platform for students to learn new skills and share what they make and do with a global community. Educators can use DIY.org to explore skill-based learning and introduce collaboration into their classrooms. Teachers can blend the DIY.org Skills platform into their core curriculum, or let their students explore new subjects while practicing skills.

How to use DIY.org?

Each skill links to challenges that users can complete to earn a badge. The badge is virtual, but a real woven patch can also be purchased. After completing a challenge, users can post photos and/or video of their project to inspire others and to solicit feedback. Click here to see the skills students can earn patches for. Additionally, users are able to build an online portfolio of their work on the platform.

Check out this video overview from Marvin Puspoki:

Examples of DIY.org

Resources for DIY.org

How to make a DIY.org club

ReMaking Education: Designing Classroom Makerspaces for Transformative Learning

Makers in the Classroom: A How-To Guide

About the Author

Raina Burditt is currently a technology teacher at Memphis University School in Memphis, TN. She trains both students and teachers in technology integration. She has presented at Tennessee Teach Meet, the TAIS Biennial Conference, the TAIS Technology Conference, the Lausanne Learning Institute, the Mid-South Technology Conference, and the AMLE Conference for Middle Level Educators.

Maker Education: A Quick Introduction

Guest Blogger
Kaylah Holland

Maker Movement in Education(Image Source)

Edutopia defines Marker Education as “a unique combination of artistry, circuitry, and old-fashioned craftsmanship” (source). This type of making is not a new idea but, until a few years ago, has not been in education and has been growing in implementation ever since.

What is Maker Education?

Several terms are involved with Maker Education such as tinker, hack, create, modify, build, and invent (source). This basic concept involves changing the traditional lecture style of education to a more engaging hands-on environment where students are learning through active projects. This style of learning does not have traditional assessments but uses the finished product as the assessment; thus, completely flipping the traditional style of learning.

Why implement Maker Education?

The following four mindsets show the benefits of implementing Maker Education into the classroom.

Maker Movement

(Screenshot Source)

Resources for Maker Education

Implementing Maker Education within your classroom does not have to be difficult. Start with one project and allow students to build or create something tangible. You can use Pinterest or Instructables to find handy DIY projects for the classroom simply be searching. You will soon become hooked on the idea and will begin to modify your own lesson plans to include more making.

The following websites are great resources.

Maker Education

(Image Source)


About the AuthorKaylah Holland

Kaylah Holland is currently a Middle School Instructional Technology Facilitator at Charlotte Christian School in Charlotte, NC. In addition to teaching coding, app development, and robotics; she has a vital role of assisting teachers with the integration of technology into the classroom through ample research, lesson planning, and training. She is currently completing her doctoral degree in the field of Instructional Design and Technology and is in the process of becoming a Google Certified Trainer. She is passionate about building an innovative culture for learning.